my results:  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
  9ways
  What is...?
    Prevention
    Risk
    A Screening Test
 
  How to...
    Estimate Risk
 
  Community Action
 
    Disclaimer
    Privacy Policy
    About This Site
    Link to Us
    Glossary
   

© Copyright 2013
Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine

 
Risk factors

Most scientists agree that these things affect the risk of prostate cancer. Some may apply to you, but others may not.

Age
Height
Animal Fat
Tomatoes
Calcium
Family history
African-American ethnicity
Asian ethnicity



Age and prostate cancer
The risk of prostate cancer goes up with age. Most cases are diagnosed in men over the age of 50.

Back to top

Height and prostate cancer
Tall men have a higher risk of prostate cancer. Researchers don’t know exactly why, but it may be related to the fact that tall people grow more. Some of the same hormones and other factors that make people grow may also increase the chance that dividing cells become abnormal and turn cancerous.

Back to top

Animal fat and prostate cancer
Men who eat fewer than 5 servings a day of animal fat have a lower risk of prostate cancer. Scientists don’t know exactly why, but one reason may be that animal fat in the diet can alter hormone levels leading to a higher cancer risk.

Foods high in animal fat include red meat (beef, port, lamb, and veal), whole milk, and cheese. One serving is about the size of a deck of cards.

Men who eat limited amounts of animal fat may also have lower blood cholesterol levels and a lower risk of heart disease.

Back to top

Tomatoes and prostate cancer
Men who eat one or more servings of tomato-based foods per day have a lower risk of prostate cancer. This is probably because tomatoes have an antioxidant called lycopene. Antioxidents, like lycopene, are substances that can help repair cell damage and protect cells from becoming cancerous.

Tomato-based foods include tomatoes themselves, spaghetti sauce, salsa and pizza sauce. One serving is about 1/2 cup of sauce.

Back to top

Calcium and prostate cancer
While calcium is good for bone health and can help lower the risk of colon cancer, getting too much calcium can increase the risk of prostate cancer. It's not exactly clear why this is, but a very high calcium diet may lower levels of certain substances in the body that can keep cells from turning cancerous. Try to stay near the national recommendations for calcium: adults under 50 years old should get 1000 mg a day; adults 50 and older should get 1200 mg a day.

Back to top

 

Family history and prostate cancer
Men who have a father or brother with prostate cancer have a higher risk of the disease. This is because some prostate cancer is linked to mutations (changes) in the genetic structure (DNA) of the body’s cells that can be passed from generation to generation.

Back to top

African-American ethnicity and prostate cancer
African-American men have a higher risk of prostate cancer than other groups of men. In fact, African-American men have the highest rates of prostate cancer in the world. Scientists aren't sure exactly why, but it may be related to differences in diet and/or hormone levels.

Back to top

Asian ethnicity and prostate cancer
Asian men have a lower risk of prostate cancer than other groups of men. Researchers aren’t sure exactly why, but it may be related to differences in diet and/or hormone levels.

Back to top